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Understanding Bite Occlusion Dentistry

When looking for a dentist who practices family dentistry, it is important to find one who is able to provide care for your specific oral health care needs. If you have dental problems due to an overbite or underbite, you should consider seeking a dentist with a focus on treating patients with these types of conditions. This article will provide an overview of what bite occlusion dentistry in Alpharetta is and treatment options available. bite occlusion dentistry in alpharetta, ga

What is Bite Occlusion Dentistry?

Simply put, occlusion refers to your bite, or how your upper and lower teeth come in contact with each other. Bite occlusion dentistry focuses on the contact your teeth make when you bite, chew, or close your jaw. A dentist will focus on how the forces of these actions impact your teeth and gums, as well as the muscles and joints in your jaw and neck. They will assess your bite and prevent or treat any possible problems.

What are Common Occlusion Problems?

Abnormalities of occlusion, also known as malocclusion, can include crowded teeth, cross-bite, overbite, underbite, and open bite. In other words, malocclusion is a bad bite. This can all lead to a number of different symptoms such as headaches, muscle and joint pain, and tooth sensitivity or pain. When left untreated malocclusion can lead to more serious complications; one of the most common is temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ).

What Treatment is Available for Occlusion?

If your occlusion is causing dental problems, your dentist will develop a treatment plan to make the necessary adjustments to give you a better bite. Your dentist will likely do a series of x-rays to fully diagnose the issues causing malocclusion. In cases of TMJ, a CT scan will likely be ordered as well. Your dentist will then provide the best course of action for treatment. Usually this involves reshaping or restoring your teeth by using crowns or veneers. In some cases, you may need to see an orthodontist for more extensive repositioning of the teeth. For TMJ treatment, surgery of the jaw may be required in severe cases.